Environmental Protection Versus Development: A Shift From Anthropocentrism To Eco–Centrism

Authors

  • Dr. Kumud Jain

Abstract

The paper deals with the environmental protection versus development. In the introduction part the historical aspect is discussed. Need not to say the earth is unique in the solar system in the sense that it is the only place that sustains life. Life on earth has passed many stages of dynamic evolution. Human beings represent just the latest in this evolutionary period. Starting from their evolution human being has tried to achieve progress. In their endeavour to achieve that, they have now threatened the sustainability of the earth. The paper further discusses the modernization‘s impact on the environment. Without environmental protection, development cannot sustain. Environmental security is a part of sustainable development without which development cannot be a holistic thing. The paper also focuses on the various environmental conference and summit which has adopted a more nature–centred approach towards environmental problems. Further the paper also emphasizes on the judicial approach to the problems as reflected in some important cases and the legislative policies on the matter. It seems here that development has to look into the aspects of social equity, environmental sustainability and people‘s participation. In the end, the paper concludes that growth alone cannot be termed as development. There is a need to understand that our needs are related. Until and unless human being comes forward to help each other, the objective of sustainable development can never be achieved. The shift from anthropocentrism [hood of the mankind] to eco–centrism [for the sake of nature] has been reflected in the various approaches whether being a conference, summit or the judicial and legislative approach.

References

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Preamble paras 1, 2, 4 and 6 and Principle 8.

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[2002] 10 SCC 606: AIR 2003 SC 724.

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Published

30-09-2017

How to Cite

Dr. Kumud Jain. (2017). Environmental Protection Versus Development: A Shift From Anthropocentrism To Eco–Centrism. Research Inspiration: An International Multidisciplinary E-Journal, 2(IV), 44–57. Retrieved from http://researchinspiration.com/index.php/ri/article/view/73

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